Home LIFESTYLE Style News Is Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s Wedding Driving Prince George Mad?

Is Meghan Markle and Prince Harry’s Wedding Driving Prince George Mad?

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If you’ve ever wondered what Prince George might think of the fuss and fascination around Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s royal wedding, look no further than Gary Janetti’s Instagram feed.

It may not be the actual inner monologue of the four-year-old future monarch, but coming from Janetti—the Will & Grace and Family Guy writer-producer who has given hilarious voice to Megan Mullally’s socialite, Karen Walker, and sardonic prodigy/perma-baby Stewie—the Prince George memes are reliably entertaining.

Janetti, who grew up in Queens and currently lives in Los Angeles, loves British culture—he co-created the British sitcom Vicious starring Ian McKellen, and rattles off U.K. imports like The Great British Bake Off, Happy Valley, and The Fall as being favorite programs he enjoys at home with husband Brad Goreski. As an American, though, Janetti never considered himself a fan of the royal family until September 2017, when Kensington Palace released a series of photos commemorating Prince George’s first day of school at Thomas’s Battersea. The pictures proved that George—unlike his older, more press-fluent family members—hadn’t yet developed the royal mask, that stiff-smiling facade relied upon for countless public appearances.

“He was just so expressive and really cracked me up,” Janetti said over iced lattes at a cafe in West Hollywood, California, in early April. “I posted one with a caption, without giving it much thought. I did a few more and slowly developed a character for him. Then, when Meghan Markle got engaged to Harry and she was everywhere in the news, I had formed enough of a character for George that I knew, ‘Oh, [Prince George] is not going to like this.’ He is not going to like somebody else getting all the attention.”

Just as he had done with Karen and Stewie, Janetti developed a comically acerbic persona for George—though more “jealous, petty, vain, and monstrous,” considering his Shakespearian stakes.

“This boy is going to become the king of England. He’s very jealous of his new sibling. Queen Elizabeth just turned 92. All of these elements coming together, through this little kid’s eyes, is like a runaway train. To me, [the George memes] are like a little TV series, a little comic Shakespearean drama.”

“I see him as King Lear, but at age four,” Janetti continued. “I think he considers people forces to be reckoned with. King Lear was fighting to keep his crown, and not die, but George is the opposite. He’s being driven mad by the power that’s being dangled in front of him—of being the most powerful man in world. Every day there’s 100 ridiculous articles about the royal family. He’s in this maelstrom, and the closer we get to May 19, the more infuriated he’s getting because he’s inundated with something that doesn’t revolve around him. [Fictional George] is a character as fully formed as any other character I’ve ever written.”

Fictional George is so fully developed that Janetti has expanded the prince’s Instagram universe—picturing him at Coachella (to presumably blow off a little pre-wedding steam) and imagining what the heir thinks of his little sister, Charlotte (“George despises her, but knows that he can use her—she’s somebody that will be easily manipulated to do his bidding”); The Crown (“He watches . . . and wants Zac Efron to play him”); his parents (“He loves his dad, because he’s the real bloodline. With his mother, he’s a little indifferent.”); and even the Sex and the City social-media feud between Sarah Jessica Parker and Kim Cattrall (“He contacted Sarah Jessica Parker to let her know he wanted to take over for Kim and play Samantha in any future sequels”).

What does this power-crazed fictional Prince George think of America’s answer to the royals—the Kardashians?

Janetti took a beat to consider.

“He has a grudging respect for the Kardashians. He acknowledges that they’re America’s version of the royal family, which he thinks is very beneath him. At the same time, he sees what they’ve done, the empire they’ve built, and the amount of fame that they have . . . so there’s a little bit of acknowledgment, like, ‘Hello.’“

Though fictional George thinks that Markle is “basic”—the most damning criticism in this social-media-suffocating day and age—Janetti sincerely likes the future princess.

“I think people have a misconception that I personally don’t like her, and that’s not true . . . I think she’s very pretty, modern, stylish. Sometimes people on Instagram don’t realize the difference between what I think and what this character thinks.”

Sometimes, Janetti consults with Goreski before publishing a meme. But if Goreski thinks Janetti’s caption might be too controversial, the writer usually confers with a backup consultant—Family Guy writer and show-runner Alec Sulkin: “Alec will never say no.” Janetti considers British royals—like fashion—to be a subject that should not be taken too seriously.

“It’s insane to me how seriously people who work in fashion take the industry . . . Similarly, there’s something kind of ridiculous, especially to an American, about how in 2018 we have kings and queens, and the Queen is the head of the church.”

Janetti didn’t think much of his meme momentum until he started being publicly recognized—a bizarre experience for someone who has spent his entire career behind the scenes, save for a brief supporting role on Bravo’s late reality series It’s a Brad, Brad World, about Goreski’s life as a Hollywood stylist. When celebrities started D.M.ing him to comment on the memes, Janetti knew he had reached a new level. (Though he doesn’t think the royal family has seen his work—“There’s something crass about trolling Instagram, and I imagine it goes against protocol”—he hopes they “would have a sense of humor about it.”)

For Janetti, who celebrates his 20th anniversary at Family Guy this summer, the Instagram account is just a fun hobby—not some pursuit he hopes to spin off into other mediums. “Social media is so democratic. I do what I want to do, and there’s nothing that stands between me and my audience. If I think of this as producing a little TV show, I’m controlling how many episodes go out. I’m controlling the arc of the season, when it ends.”

And with so much buildup around the wedding, there is no doubt that Markle and Harry’s looming nuptials will make for the multi-part finale. So how is George dealing with the stress of the mounting royal scenario?

“He’s not relaxing. He’s probably trying to de-stress—by doing yoga, probably Pilates. He’s done a Barry’s Bootcamp and whatever’s on trend. He’s probably done a den meditation, tried teas . . . but none of it is working, because he can’t quiet his mind. He’s plotting most of the time in his room, reading every word written about Meghan Markle. He’s dissecting everything—every comment on every article. He’s obsessed, and is almost being driven mad.”

With the wedding just days away, Janetti is trying not to make any predictions for how Prince George will figure into the proceedings. But he did voice a few tentative wishes that would maximize drama.

“I really hope he’s tired, has a tantrum, and I hope he’s not in those pantaloons,” laughed Janetti. “I think the holy grail now is to somehow get a picture of Meghan and George because they’ve never been photographed together. The wedding feels like a culmination. I’m just as curious and invested as everybody else, but only because of this alternative universe that I’ve created.”

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When then princess Elizabeth was born in 1926, her father was still the Duke of York—with no hint he’d ever be king. After Edward VIII abdicated the throne in 1936, 10-year-old Elizabeth would become the next in line. She’s seen here at her christening, when she was about one month old.

When then princess Elizabeth was born in 1926, her father was still the Duke of York—with no hint he’d ever be king. After Edward VIII abdicated the throne in 1936, 10-year-old Elizabeth would become the next in line. She’s seen here at her christening, when she was about one month old.

In a formal portrait when she was a bit older, Princess Elizabeth grabs onto the pearls she’s wearing with her formal baby gown. The Duchess of York looks intently over her shoulder.

In a formal portrait when she was a bit older, Princess Elizabeth grabs onto the pearls she’s wearing with her formal baby gown. The Duchess of York looks intently over her shoulder.

When Queen Elizabeth became a mother in 1948, she was just 22 years old—Charles was born almost exactly a year after she married Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, although, controversially, Charles legally took Elizabeth’s Windsor surname and not his father’s (Mountbatten). He was just five weeks old when this photograph was taken.

When Queen Elizabeth became a mother in 1948, she was just 22 years old—Charles was born almost exactly a year after she married Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, although, controversially, Charles legally took Elizabeth’s Windsor surname and not his father’s (Mountbatten). He was just five weeks old when this photograph was taken.

At the time of Prince Charles’s christening, the gatherings were stiffer and quite formal—for this portrait, the family gathered in Buckingham Palace’s music room. Above Elizabeth, Prince Philip stands next to King George VI.

At the time of Prince Charles’s christening, the gatherings were stiffer and quite formal—for this portrait, the family gathered in Buckingham Palace’s music room. Above Elizabeth, Prince Philip stands next to King George VI.

William and Harry remain close, and at one point even dressed alike: they are playing here together (in fittingly British baby tattersall) in Kensington Palace’s playroom, where year-old Harry is learning to walk.

William and Harry remain close, and at one point even dressed alike: they are playing here together (in fittingly British baby tattersall) in Kensington Palace’s playroom, where year-old Harry is learning to walk.

Former school teacher Diana, known as a warm and caring mother above all else, oversaw the boys' early education and activities--here she is “instructing” them in piano. Harry has just finished playing a little Liszt.

Former school teacher Diana, known as a warm and caring mother above all else, oversaw the boys’ early education and activities–here she is “instructing” them in piano. Harry has just finished playing a little Liszt.

Fewer than 30 years after showing Harry how to walk in K.P.’s apartment, Prince William stands proudly with his wife, pregnant with their own child. Their son or daughter is due sometime next year—let the feverish frenzy begin.

Fewer than 30 years after showing Harry how to walk in K.P.’s apartment, Prince William stands proudly with his wife, pregnant with their own child. Their son or daughter is due sometime next year—let the feverish frenzy begin.

When then princess Elizabeth was born in 1926, her father was still the Duke of York—with no hint he’d ever be king. After Edward VIII abdicated the throne in 1936, 10-year-old Elizabeth would become the next in line. She’s seen here at her christening, when she was about one month old.

In a formal portrait when she was a bit older, Princess Elizabeth grabs onto the pearls she’s wearing with her formal baby gown. The Duchess of York looks intently over her shoulder.

When Queen Elizabeth became a mother in 1948, she was just 22 years old—Charles was born almost exactly a year after she married Prince Philip of Greece and Denmark, although, controversially, Charles legally took Elizabeth’s Windsor surname and not his father’s (Mountbatten). He was just five weeks old when this photograph was taken.

At the time of Prince Charles’s christening, the gatherings were stiffer and quite formal—for this portrait, the family gathered in Buckingham Palace’s music room. Above Elizabeth, Prince Philip stands next to King George VI.

Though much has been made of Elizabeth and Philip’s various absences during Charles’s childhood, they had their share of fun—the trio is shown here in July of 1949, all having a laugh.

And in proof that parenting trends have changed over the years, Charles—in November 1950—watches a procession of visiting Netherlandish royals from a rail-less ledge.

By 1951, Charles had a sibling—younger sister Princess Anne, who is amused by Prince Philip’s chin in this summertime family photo.

In July of 1981, Prince Charles married blushing virgin Diana Spencer, wedded just days after her 20th birthday. Di quickly became pregnant with their first child, Prince William. And because pregnancy is no excuse for missing royal functions, Diana is seen here in a pink shirtdress on the outskirts of the Guards Club in Windsor while Charles plays in a polo match.

Less than a year after their wedding date—just like Elizabeth and Philip before them—Charles and Diana greeted the throngs outside St. Mary’s Hospital in London with their new son, William Arthur Philip Louis, on June 21, 1982.

Prince William’s official christening, six weeks after his birth, was a less starchy affair than that of Charles, all regal poses and smile-less faces. In this Buckingham Palace photo of the family after the ceremony, Diana beams at William while the Queen Mother (right) and Queen Elizabeth (left) flank her. Prince Charles and Prince Philip are above.

The Queen Mother outdoes even Diana in enthusiasm, though, with this rollicking smile, holding her great-grandson at his christening in August of 1982. As it happened, Prince William’s christening took place on her 82nd birthday.

By December, six-month-old William had become adorably pudgy, and Prince Charles holds him for a photograph at Kensington Palace. Diana and Charles shared an apartment at “K.P.,” where Will and Kate will soon reside.

Prince William was not yet one when he went on his first royal tour, to Auckland, New Zealand. On the grounds of the city’s Government House, doting mother Diana helps him practice his stride.

Just over two years after William’s birth, Henry Charles Albert David—to be known simply as Harry—was born to Diana and Charles, who presented him on September 1, 1984. Outside St. Mary’s, crowds with British flags and cameras again lined the streets to welcome the new prince.

Disembarking from a plane at Aberdeen, Princess Diana carries her younger son, Harry—bundled up in an adorable snow-white sweater, booties, and hat—as she arrives in Scotland’s chilly December air.

William and Harry remain close, and at one point even dressed alike: they are playing here together (in fittingly British baby tattersall) in Kensington Palace’s playroom, where year-old Harry is learning to walk.

Former school teacher Diana, known as a warm and caring mother above all else, oversaw the boys’ early education and activities–here she is “instructing” them in piano. Harry has just finished playing a little Liszt.

Fewer than 30 years after showing Harry how to walk in K.P.’s apartment, Prince William stands proudly with his wife, pregnant with their own child. Their son or daughter is due sometime next year—let the feverish frenzy begin.

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